2015 twenty four merry days of Perl Feed

Perl and Redis

Redis::* - 2015-12-20

Redis is high performance in memory key-value-store and data structure server. It runs as a simple daemon alongside your Perl code that you can talk to over the network sending data back and forward for it to persist between invocations and between processes.

We find that it has affinity with the way we write our application code: We can use Redis variables and data structures as super global variables that are not only accessible from everywhere in a Perl script but from every process on every server in our infrastructure every time they run. It is very useful and powerful (and dangerous :p).

These global variables have lots of use, from a simple shared cache, to things like global work queues, process synchronization, or shared leader boards.

    shell$ redis-cli ping
    PONG
    shell$ redis-cli set snowman frosty
    OK
    shell$ redis-cli get snowman
    "frosty"
    shell$ redis-cli lpush gifts gold
    (integer) 1
    shell$ redis-cli lpush gifts frankincense
    (integer) 2
    shell$ redis-cli lpush gifts myrrh
    (integer) 3
    shell$ redis-cli lpop gifts
    "myrrh"
    shell$ redis-cli lpop gifts
    "frankincense"
    shell$ redis-cli lpop gifts
    "gold"
    shell$ redis-cli lpop gifts
    (nil)
    shell$

Redis's documentation is very full and we can try the commands in interactive console in a web browser!

Let's introduce the CPAN modules around Redis.

Redis

The original Redis module is a Perl interface to talk to a Redis server:


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my $redis = Redis->new;
$redis->incr('blah');

 

Redis.pm is pure Perl implementation so, stable and easy to understand, but a little bit slow, especially for caching where you don't want a lot of overhead.

Redis::Fast

Redis::Fast is an alternative faster client module for Redis. It has the same Redis.pm interfaces built using XS, so "Fast". You can use Redis::Fast instead of Redis.pm without making any code changes other than initially instantiating a different object.


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my $redis = Redis::Fast->new;
$redis->incr('blah');

 

In my work (online games, SNS and so on), Redis::Fast is also stable and very fast.

Cache::Redis

Cache::Cache is a standard caching interface while allows you to easily swap out backend caching technologies - in memory stores, on disk files, memcache, etc - without making changes to your code.

I wanted to use Redis as caching storage so I wrote a Cache::Cache compatible interface client library for Redis called Cache::Redis:


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my $redis = Redis::Fast->new; # you can use Redis.pm too.
my $cache = Cache::Redis->new(redis => $redis);
$cache->set(blah => 1);
say $cache->get('blah'); # 1

 

Redis also has an interface, CHI::Driver::Redis, to the CHI caching framework.

Redis::LeaderBoard

Redis not only allows you to store simple key/value pairs on the server, but has a rich API that allows you to manipulate more complex data structures that it can store.

Redis's "sorted set" is very useful for creating leaderboards but, which don't return "unique" rank (cf. https://github.com/antirez/redis/issues/943>). So I wrote the ranking module using Redis which takes care of "unique" rank.


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use Redis::Fast;
use Redis::LeaderBoard;
my $redis = Redis::Fast->new;
my $lb = Redis::LeaderBoard->new(
    redis => $redis,
    key => 'leader_board:1',
    order => 'asc', # asc/desc, desc as default
);
$lb->set_score(one => 100);
$lb->set_score(two => 50);
my ($rank, $score) = $lb->get_rank_with_score('one'); #=> (1, 100)

 

I introduce a technique. That is "using epoch as score".


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my $lb = Redis::LeaderBoard->new(
    redis => $redis,
    key => 'recent_post',
    limit => 20,
);
$lb->set_score($url, $updated->epoch);
...
# you can get recent posts up to 20 entries
my $recent_posts = $lb->rankings;

 

Redis::Namespace

Generally, key management of a key-value-store is very difficult and confusing (easy to conflict with existing keys used elsewhere in code or other applications using the same Redis server, typo and so on). Key-value-store is very cool, but with this "super global variables store" we must appropriately manage the keys.

We can use Redis::Namespace for better key name management.


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my $redis = Redis::Fast->new;
my $ns = Redis::Namespace->new(redis => $redis, namespace => 'ranking');
$ns->set(foo => 'bar'); # will call $redis->set('fugu:foo', 'bar');
my $foo = $ns->get('foo'); # will call $redis->get('fugu:foo');

 

The object of Redis::Namespace is to fill up the prefix namespace automatically. I recommend the all Redis objects are wrapped by Redis::Namespace.

Conclusion

CPAN's Redis modules allow you to quickly, easily, and safely leverage the power of Redis from Perl.

SEE ALSO

Gravatar Image This article contributed by: Masayuki Matsuki <songmu@cpan.org>